News Volvo CEO says diesels won’t stick around in its cars for much longer

15:52  19 may  2017
15:52  19 may  2017 Source:   Driving.ca

New Volvo XC60 Will Steer You Away From Potential Accidents

  New Volvo XC60 Will Steer You Away From Potential Accidents Not only will the Volvo XC60 undergo a complete design overhaul in the coming weeks, but it will also usher in new safety features for the brand. The compact crossover will receive three new driver assistance features aimed at steering drivers away from potential accidents. First off, Volvo has enhanced its City Safety system to include steering assistance, a new feature that engages in situations when automatic braking alone isn't enough to stop a potential collision. The system helps steer the car away from an obstacle ahead at speeds between 31 and 62 mph.

A perfect storm could spell the end for Volvo ‘s diesel engines, according to company CEO Hakan Samuelsson. Speaking to a German newspaper, Samuelsson says he doesn’ t see much life in Volvo ‘s latest crop of diesel engines – which themselves aren’ t available in North America to begin with.

The most common thing to get damaged in a pothole battle is the tire, according to Adam. “Usually they either suffer from broken belts or sidewall beads or blow-outs.” Volvo CEO says diesels won ’ t stick around in its cars for much longer .

  Volvo CEO says diesels won’t stick around in its cars for much longer © Provided by Driving.ca

A perfect storm could spell the end for Volvo‘s diesel engines, according to company CEO Hakan Samuelsson.

Speaking to a German newspaper, Samuelsson says he doesn’t see much life in Volvo’s latest crop of diesel engines – which themselves aren’t available in North America to begin with.

“From today’s perspective, we will not develop any more new-generation diesel engines,” Samuelsson said. A Volvo spokesman further confirmed that, while anything is possible, Samuelsson is simply discussing options for the future of Volvo’s powertrains.

Still, the current landscape doesn’t paint a promising picture for Volvo’s diesels. Samuelsson believes tighter emissions standards will push up the development costs of diesels, to the point where plug-in hybrids will become more cost-effective.

That said, Samuelsson still believes Volvo’s diesels have their place. Until 2020, Samuelsson noted diesels are still necessary to meet the European Union’s tightening emissions standards, and could remain in production until 2023 or so with a mid-life refresh to keep them as clean and efficient as possible.

After that, count on seeing more electrified Volvos – starting with the Swedish automaker’s first all-electric car, due out in 2019.

Polestar Will Make Its Own Electric Sports Car .
Polestar's ambitious plan may be related to parent company Geely's recent purchase of Lotus.There are a number of reasons why this makes sense. We know that Volvo will launch its first electric car in 2019, which will be based on their compact platform and built exclusively in China. The company is also working on a larger, SPA platform based electric model and the hybridization of the entire range, while Polestar claims the days of their non-hybrid performance models are numbered.

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