News BlackBerry developing a virus scanner for cars, report claims

17:40  19 may  2017
17:40  19 may  2017 Source:   MSN

Higher US Fuel Economy Standards Don’t Lead to Pricier Cars, Finds Study

  Higher US Fuel Economy Standards Don’t Lead to Pricier Cars, Finds Study It's pretty clear that a car or truck that uses less fuel will cost you less to fill up. But now automakers are claiming that higher fuel efficiency standards make for more expensive cars, hurting buyers (and new car sales). But is that really the case? The Consumers Union, the policy and action division of Consumer Reports, has issued a report on the contentious topic, and they say that the answer is no. The US Environmental Protection Agency finalized their 2025 fuel economy standards earlier this year. After that announcement, the Auto Alliance, an advocacy group of 12 major automakers including General Motors, Ford, BMW, Toyota, and Volkswagen, sent a letter of complaint to the EPA, claiming that the higher costs of the standards would raise car prices, causing "up to 1.1 million Americans to lose jobs due to lost vehicle sales," as well as impacting low-income buyers who could no longer afford new cars. Longtime consumer advocates the Consumers Union knew that spending less on fuel saved money at the pumps, but wanted to verify the new car costs. And what they found was a surprise. The Consumers Union report started with a look at the US Consumer Price Index. It's a measure of how the price of a basket of household items changes over time. The CPI for all items in 2016 was 1.5 times what it was in 1997. Meaning that households are spending 50 percent more for what they need than they were 20 years ago.

It's currently being tested in high-end vehicles, a financial analyst claims .

Think of BlackBerry 's service as a virus scanner for cars . Automotive cybersecurity is an increasingly popular topic, especially as companies finally begin developing and testing autonomous vehicles.

BlackBerry developing a virus scanner for cars, report claims © CNET BlackBerry developing a virus scanner for cars, report claims

With the increasing computerization of vehicles comes additional cybersecurity concerns. BlackBerry, which already has a strong presence in the auto industry, thinks it can assuage those concerns with a new service.

BlackBerry is working on a security device that could scan a car for computer viruses, Reuters reports, citing Macquarie financial analyst Gus Papageorgiou. Two high-end automakers are reportedly testing the service right now. BlackBerry spokeswoman Sarah McKinney declined to comment.

Think of BlackBerry's service as a virus scanner for cars. Not only can it warn drivers when a vehicle might be compromised, but it's also reportedly capable of installing security patches on idle vehicles. It could be baked into vehicles, but BlackBerry will reportedly generate roughly $10 per vehicle per month, so it sounds like a subscription service. It's unclear if the automaker would eat the cost, or pass it on to the consumer.

Intel reportedly acquiring Mobileye's self-driving car technology in $15 billion deal

  Intel reportedly acquiring Mobileye's self-driving car technology in $15 billion deal Intel is reportedly acquiring Mobileye, a company that specializes in chips for vision-based autonomous vehicles. The Marker and Axios both claim the deal is valued at around $15 billion, and it will see Intel take over some key technology for its ambitions to lead autonomous cars. BMW, Intel, and Mobileye have all partnered to deploy 40 autonomous vehicles for testing on public roads later this year. Intel and Mobileye’s technology is to be tested on roads in the US and Europe.

BlackBerry developing a virus scanner for cars , report claims – Roadshow. Pitcher perfect: Sweet, fresh summer fruits punch up cocktail recipes. Make Eggs! My Top Ten Egg Recipes. Baked — my car turned into an oven.

BlackBerry working with automakers on anti-hack tool -analyst. Why BlackBerry Ltd (BBRY) Stock Can Reach Sooner Than You Think. BlackBerry developing a virus scanner for cars , report claims .

Video: Blackberry CEO on transition to security-focused software company

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BlackBerry offers software for running computer systems on cars

  BlackBerry offers software for running computer systems on cars By Alastair Sharp

BlackBerry developing a virus scanner for cars , report claims . Canceled BlackBerry Ontario Revealed in Real Images. BlackBerry working with automakers on anti-hack tool, claims analyst.

More stories. BlackBerry developing a virus scanner for cars , report claims . TI focuses radar on the driver and on the road. Your next Volvo or Audi may have an Android infotainment system.

Automotive cybersecurity is an increasingly popular topic, especially as companies finally begin developing and testing autonomous vehicles. If a computer is trusted with keeping you alive as it hurtles down the road at 75 mph, you'll want to make sure you trusted a computer that's not going to end up infected with something, sort of how you might not trust a babysitter that's been arrested for kidnapping.

The issue of automotive cybersecurity entered the public eye in 2015, when Wired ran a piece on two researchers who uncovered vulnerabilities in a Jeep that could put a driver in serious danger. That story led to a recall of more than 1 million vehicles, as Fiat Chrysler hustled to patch the vulnerability. Having a system that could reasonably scan itself to prevent dangerous situations could go a long way in assuaging customer fears about new cars and new technology.

You might not have heard BlackBerry's name in some time, but the company is more than just a purveyor of cellphones with physical keyboards. It also produces the QNX operating system, which dozens of automakers use as the basis for their infotainment systems. QNX currently resides in more than 50 million vehicles worldwide.

Lotus sells loads more cars, earns way more money .
Good news for the little sports car company.According to the company, it sold nearly 60 percent more cars in mainland Europe compared with the 2015/2016 fiscal year, and it sold six times as many cars in the U.S. compared with that year. This helped it go from a loss of £16.3 million for the previous year in earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) to a £2 million profit EBITDA.

Source: http://ca.pressfrom.com/autos/news/-28504-blackberry-developing-a-virus-scanner-for-cars-report-claims/

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