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Food & Drink We're Eating Too Much Food at Work, Says Buzzkill Study

19:27  14 june  2018
19:27  14 june  2018 Source:   msn.com

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The study —which had 5,222 employees from across the US self-reporting what foods they got from work over a seven-day period—found that the most “Employers can encourage healthier foods at meetings and events, especially when the employer is providing free food to employees,” he said .

But can we really die from eating too much ? It's nearly impossible for the stomach to explode from overeating, Mary Roach, the author of "Gulp," said in an interview with … If you’ re a junk food junkie or have a monster sweet tooth, you could be doing damage to your health.

a woman wearing a hat and a toothbrush © Provided by TIME Inc.

Did you get any food from work today? Not food you brought yourself, but food specifically provided by your employer or someone at work? Maybe you indulged in an infamous coworker birthday cake? Or maybe you had to work late so your boss ordered in from that sushi place that she loves but you think is overrated?

Whatever the reason, according to new preliminary research presented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at the annual meeting of the American Society for Nutrition, a quarter of people surveyed said they acquired food from their workplace at some point during the week. Among this group that was given some grub, the calories they were consuming were far higher than many might think.

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But many studies have shown that we make terrible food choices when we ’ re distracted. One found that moviegoers ate 45% more popcorn when it came in a large container rather than a medium-sized one.

The study also found that free food was the most common source of food for people at work . Only 8 percent of survey participants bought food at work , while 17 percent ate for free. Researchers say that employers should take some responsibility for this trend and think more about how to provide

“Nearly one in four working adults obtained food at work during the week, and the food and beverages that they got added up to an average of nearly 1,300 calories, more than half the recommended daily calorie intake for the average adult,” lead author Stephen Onufrak, an epidemiologist in the CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, told ABC News. “With employees spending eight hours a day on average at their place of employment, a lot of people may not be aware of all of the calories they get from work, especially from foods they get for free.”

Onufrak said that, of the 25 percent that got food from work, 17 percent were people getting free food, potentially adding to the ease with which people were eating more than they thought. “The majority of the calories people got at work, people didn't pay for,” Onufrak explained, “70 percent of the calories were free.” The study—which had 5,222 employees from across the US self-reporting what foods they got from work over a seven-day period—found that the most common candidates consumed based on the number calories were pizza, sandwiches, and sugary soft drinks. Other usual suspects included coffee, tea, cookies, brownies, French fries, salad, water and diet soda.

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Everyone knows we should all be eating healthier, working out more and generally making better life decisions. Here are the one’s I’ve found to work best. How To Eat Healthy Without Being A Buzzkill . Instead of: “Yuck, I can’t believe you’ re eating that disgusting excuse for a calzone.”

Baby, we ' re just born this way. Citations: A Bizarre ' Study ' Claims That Eating Too Much Fast Food Can Turn You Gay (The Gaily Grind), ' Study ' claims fast food consumption and sleep deprivation cause homosexuality (Queerty).

Overall, Onufrak hopes his findings will encourage companies to focus on employee health and provide something other than empty calories. “Employers can encourage healthier foods at meetings and events, especially when the employer is providing free food to employees,” he said. “Providing delicious, appealing, healthy food can also help to create a culture of health at a workplace.” Though perhaps he might want to hammer this idea home by writing it in pepperonis on a pizza?

The best time to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner according to experts .
The best time to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner according to experts And scientists believe our internal clocks are to blame. (This relationship or link between what we eat and how it affects our body clock is known by some as "chrono-nutrition.")"We have a body clock that determines that every 24 hours each metabolic process has an optimal time when something should happen," Dr. Pot added. "That suggests that having a large meal in the evening is actually, metabolically speaking, not the right thing to do because your body is already winding down for the night.

Source: http://ca.pressfrom.com/lifestyle/food-and-drink/-79147-were-eating-too-much-food-at-work-says-buzzkill-study/

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