Canada Not guilty pleas entered in B.C. polygamy trial

21:41  18 april  2017
21:41  18 april  2017 Source:   MSN

Not guilty pleas entered in B.C. polygamy trial

  Not guilty pleas entered in B.C. polygamy trial The leader of a fundamentalist sect that condones plural marriage stood silently in a British Columbia courtroom Tuesday, hands clasped in front of a pressed black suit, as a B.C. Supreme Court judge asked how he would plead to a charge of polygamy. "The accused stands mute, my lady," Winston Blackmore's lawyer, Blair Suffredine, said after a moment of silence.

2. I enter a plea of NOT GUILTY to the charge(s) and request a: CHECK ONLY ONE [ ] Non-Jury Trial (I understand my right to a Jury Trial , including the right to Counsel and the right to participate in the selection of the jury, and do hereby knowingly, intelligently and voluntarily waive (give up)

This Account has been suspended.

  Not guilty pleas entered in B.C. polygamy trial © Provided by thecanadianpress.com

CRANBROOK, B.C. - The trial of two men from a fundamentalist sect that condones plural marriage began with not guilty pleas being entered on charges of practising polygamy.

The British Columbia Supreme Court criminal trial of Winston Blackmore and James Oler, who each face one count of polygamy, began in a Cranbrook court today, not far from their community of Bountiful in southeastern B.C.

Oler, who is accused of having four wives, pleaded not guilty in court.

Blackmore remained mute and Justice Sheri Ann Donegan said a not guilty plea would be entered on his behalf.

Same-day marriages with girls sharing same last name cited at polygamy trial

  Same-day marriages with girls sharing same last name cited at polygamy trial Dozens of marriage certificates, some referencing weddings taking place on the same day involving girls with the same last name, were entered as evidence Wednesday at the trial of two fundamentalist church leaders charged with polygamy in British Columbia.Winston Blackmore is the head of a religious group in Bountiful, a community in southeastern B.C. where residents are known for practising a faith that condones plural marriage.Blackmore is accused of marrying 24 women and is standing trial alongside former leader James Oler, who an indictment says has four wives.

Canada’s best-known polygamist , Winston Kaye Blackmore, and his former brother-in-law, James Marion Oler, will face one count each of polygamy when the trial begins Tuesday in B . C The “removal” trial was held in November. The Blackmores were found guilty and are awaiting sentencing.

Canada’s best-known polygamist , Winston Kaye Blackmore, and his former brother-in-law, James Marion Oler, will face one count each of polygamy when the trial begins Tuesday in B . C The “removal” trial was held in November. The Blackmores were found guilty and are awaiting sentencing.

Blackmore, is accused of marrying 24 women over 25 years in the community that follows the beliefs of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ and Latter-day Saints.

At the start of the trial, Donegan released her reasons for rejecting an application from Blackmore to be tried separately from Oler, saying a substantial overlap in evidence against the two men means it is in the public interest for them to be tried together.

The judge says she's not concerned about the defence argument that hearing evidence against Oler will prejudice her decision in Blackmore's case.

The trial is scheduled to last several weeks.

Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous story said Blackmore verbally pleaded guilty.

Polygamy trial now to include a constitutional challenge of the law .
Suddenly, the polygamy trial of two fundamentalist Mormon leaders was transformed Thursday from a criminal trial into a constitutional challenge involving religious freedom. CRANBROOK, B.C. — Suddenly, the polygamy trial of two fundamentalist Mormon leaders was transformed Thursday from a criminal trial into a constitutional challenge involving religious freedom.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!