Technology Apple is on a mission to only use recycled materials

20:01  20 april  2017
20:01  20 april  2017 Source:   Engadget

Qualcomm countersues Apple over iPhone and iPad royalties

  Qualcomm countersues Apple over iPhone and iPad royalties For years, Apple and Qualcomm have worked together on technology that' goes inside your iPhone and iPad. Qualcomm specifically handles a lot of the modem chips that connect devices to cellular or WiFi networks, and are crucial to any mobile hardware. Since Apple needed a lot of chips, Qualcomm supplied them, and everything seemed good -- until January when Apple filed a $1 billion lawsuit claiming Qualcomm charged royalties on tech it had nothing to do with, and then followed up with two more antitrust lawsuits in China.

Apple wants to end the practice of using mined raw materials like aluminum and gold in its products. Apple believes that it's now on the road to being able to use only recycled materials to build its next generation of products.

Apple wants to end the practice of using mined raw materials like aluminum and gold in its products. Reprints and Permissions. Privacy Policy. Terms of Use . Trademarks. Advertise.

  Apple is on a mission to only use recycled materials © Provided by Engadget With the release of its new environmental report, Apple is looking to push the envelope of what it can do for the good of the planet. Last year, it boasted about how much cash its recycling efforts had saved it, including $40 million worth of gold re-used from old devices. This year, it's talking about "closing the loop" on its use of raw materials, potentially redefining how gadgets are made altogether.

Apple believes that it's now on the road to being able to use only recycled materials to build its next generation of products. It's not there yet, of course, and there's still much to be done in order to ensure secondhand iPhones come back to Apple, rather than the scrap heap. Still, if the company can make good on its admittedly lofty goals in the next few years, it's good for everyone.

Apple will leave millions of iPhones out in the cold with the next iOS update

  Apple will leave millions of iPhones out in the cold with the next iOS update Apple is currently beta testing the next reiteration of iOS, but it seems the upcoming version 10.3.2 will never make it some older iPhone models. While the Cupertino behemoth was already expected to drop support for 32-bit apps with the upcoming release of iOS 11, it seems the company might begin to phase out several 32-bit iPhone models mid-cycle starting with version 10.3.2, Forbes reports.

If you want to take a non-VR pic, you can use its OverCapture feature that punches out the composition you want from a spherical image. Apple wants to end the practice of using mined raw materials like aluminum and gold in its products.

With these online resources you should be able to better understand -- and more responsibly enjoy -- the wondrous world of semi-legalized weed using only your smartphone. Apple wants to end the practice of using mined raw materials like aluminum and gold in its products.

The company also believes that its experiments with material reclamation -- embodied by its Liam robots that disassemble 2.4 million iPhone 6 models a year. Apple says that the two lines that have a Liam on it have salvaged 1,900 kg in aluminum for every 100,000 phones taken apart. In fact, the company has built a secret run of Mac Mini units with materials recovered by Liam, which are used to run iPhone production lines.

The rest of the report is the usual self-congratulation, although it does make a big point about saying that its data centers are wholly renewable. Apple is probably mindful of Greenpeace's recent public shaming of companies like Netflix, Amazon, HBO, ASUS and Acer for using coal and gas power to run their servers. By comparison, iMessage, FaceTime and Siri "run on 100 percent renewable energy."

Man goes to China and builds iPhone out of scrap

  Man goes to China and builds iPhone out of scrap You don’t have many options if you’re on the search for an inexpensive smartphone running iOS. As everyone knows, the best way to save money is by doing things yourself. That’s the solution Scott Allen, a traveler from the U.S., settled on in China.

That'll allow an HDR10+ TV to adjust brightness on a "scene-by-scene or even frame-by-frame basis," Samsung says. Apple wants to end the practice of using mined raw materials like aluminum and gold in its products.

When it comes down to using renewable materials to create its main product, Apple has just are made using only renewable resources or recycled material to reduce the need to mine materials about its mission however, it has taken cognizance of the need to reuse these materials and that is a

Apple, famously, wants to own and control every part of its computers, and that attitude carries over to its energy. The company is aiming to own as much of its power generation as it can, rather than buying juice on the wholesale market. So, where it can, it's building, running and /owning/ its solar and wind facilities rather than partnering with a third party.

By 2020, the company is hoping to have 4 GW of power generation capacity by 2020, enough to power 725,000 homes. That will be spread between Apple owned and operated sites and those that it has helped bankroll with partners. 4GW is enough to power 725,000 homes, and that's just the start of the company's ambition. It's entirely plausible that Apple could start selling its excess power as a side hustle without anyone realizing.

As always, most of the credit goes to Lisa Jackson (pictured), a former head of the EPA that joined Apple way back in 2013. She's been spearheading the company's efforts in switching to renewables, cutting carbon emissions and generally being a good citizen of the world. Her work has ensured that Apple went from the bottom of Greenpeace's rankings in 2011 to the top for the last three years running.

Apple (.PDF)

Musical.ly syncs up with Apple Music .
 The music app gets to expand its global reach; Apple gets a new marketing partner. Apple is linking up with Musical.ly, the popular music video app. Musical.ly lets its users create and share their own music videos, using snippets of songs. Starting on Friday, Apple Music will be the service that supplies the songs, replacing UK-based provider 7digital, according to people familiar with the companies’ plans.

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