Technology Facebook rolls out GIF-supported polls feature to web and mobile apps

13:35  05 november  2017
13:35  05 november  2017 Source:   theverge.com

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Today, Facebook has rolled out a GIF - supported poll feature that allows users to post votable questions as a new status on both the web and iOS and Android apps . You will also be able to add GIFs and photos as responses, too, instead of just plain old boring text.

Facebook rolls out gif - supported polls feature to web and mobile apps Image: Facebook If you’ve ever wanted to ask your Facebook friends really import

a screenshot of a cell phone © Provided by The Verge

If you’ve ever wanted to ask your Facebook friends really important questions, like “should I have chicken nuggets, or actually cook adult food for dinner?” now you can in poll form.

Facebook has rolled out a GIF-supported poll feature that allows users to post votable questions as a new status on both the web and iOS and Android apps. You will also be able to add GIFs and photos as responses, too, instead of just plain old boring text.

To create one, just hit compose post, or click on the “what’s on your mind” section. Below the text box will be a button that says “Poll,” as well as other options. Then you can type in your question in the text box with two options for answers. There’s no limit to how long your question can be, but your responses are limited to 25 characters.

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Today, Facebook has rolled out a GIF - supported poll feature that allows users to post votable questions as a new status on both the web and iOS and Android apps . You will also be able to add GIFs and photos as responses, too, instead of just plain old boring text.

Today, Facebook has rolled out a GIF - supported poll feature that allows users to post votable questions as a new status on both the web and iOS and Android apps . You will also be able to add GIFs and photos as responses, too, instead of just plain old boring text.

To add a photo or GIF, as your answer, hit on the camera or GIF icon in the option line for responses. You can add a duration for how long you want your poll to be open, with options for one day, one week, custom, or never.

a screenshot of a cell phone © Provided by The Verge

The move follows Instagram which added polling stickers to its Stories feature just last month. Twitter also has a polling feature, but allows for up to four response options, instead of Facebook’s two.

Facebook has experimented with polls in the past: the feature perviously existed as far back as 2007 for advertisers and marketers, and was available in Groups and Events for polling members / attendees. Like the latter version of the poll feature, today’s GIF-supported polls are not anonymous; your answers will be recorded and displayed for the poster to see, just like on Instagram.

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