Technology Intel will patch all recent chips by the end of January

10:01  09 january  2018
10:01  09 january  2018 Source:   Engadget

Intel reveals chip design flaw that could have allowed hackers to access hidden info

  Intel reveals chip design flaw that could have allowed hackers to access hidden info Hardware and software manufacturers including Apple and Microsoft began pushing out patches that protected against attacks making use of the flaw. The flaw, which Intel dubbed a side-channel analysis attack,  was discovered "months ago" Intel CEO Brian Krzanich said on CNBC Wednesday. The discovery was made by researchers at Google's Project Zero security group, which reported it to the affected companies. The vulnerabilities undermine some of the most fundamental security constraints employed by modern computers, said Craig Young, a researcher at computer security company Tripwire.

Intel and MobilEye will also begin gathering data to create maps for autonomous driving systems. They'll be relying on the software built into MobilEye's EyeQ4 system-on-a- chip that's embedded in 2 million cars already on the road, including BMW's, VWs and Nissans.

Intel will patch 90 percent of all Meltdown/Spectre affected processors made in the past 5 years this week, and the rest by the end of January . The move to patch these processors means that Intel won’t be recalling its chips , which is good for the company.

a man standing in front of a flat screen monitor© Provided by Engadget The potential impact of the major processor security flaw that went public last week can't be understated. But hardware and software companies alike have been quick to patch fixes for the first two reported exploits, Meltdown and Spectre.

Intel, which to date is the company most affected by the exploits, already committed to patching "90 percent" of affected processors made in the past five years by the end of this week. Today on stage at CES, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich promised the remaining 10 percent would see fixes by the end of the month.

"We believe the performance impact of these updates is highly workload dependent," Krzanich said, referring to claims that processors may be slowed by as much as 30 percent as a result of the fixes. "We expect some may have a larger impact than others, so we'll continue working with the industry to minimize the impact on those workloads over time."

Intel says performance impact of security updates not significant

  Intel says performance impact of security updates not significant Intel Corp (INTC.O) said fixes for security issues in its microchips would not slow down computers, rebuffing concerns that the flaws found in microprocessors would significantly reduce performance. The performance impact of the recent security updates should not be significant and will be mitigated over time, Intel said late on Thursday, adding that Apple Inc, Amazon.com Inc, Google and Microsoft Corp reported little to no performance impact from the security updates. define("homepageFinanceIndices", ["c.

Intel teams up with Ferrari for AI-powered drones to analyze races. The Peak will be available for pre-order beginning January 15th and will begin shipping in early February. It's expected to retail for around 0 when it does.

90 percent of recent processors affected by Meltdown/Spectre will see fixes this week. Intel , which to date is the company most affected by the exploits, already committed to patching "90 percent" of affected processors made in the past five years by the end of this week.

Krzanich reiterated Intel's stance that there's no evidence either exploit has been used to steal customer data, and said the company is "working tirelessly on these issues to ensure it stays that way."

There's still no word on a timeline for when affected processors made over five years ago will be patched.

Click here to catch up on the latest news from CES 2018.

Finnish firm detects new Intel security flaw .
A new security flaw has been found in Intel hardware which could enable hackers to access corporate laptops remotely, Finnish cybersecurity specialist F-Secure said on Friday. F-Secure said in a statement that the flaw had nothing to do with the "Spectre" and "Meltdown" vulnerabilities recently found in the micro-chips that are used in almost all computers, tablets and smartphones today.

Source: http://ca.pressfrom.com/news/technology/-59149-intel-will-patch-all-recent-chips-by-the-end-of-january/

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