Technology The U.S. Spy Satellite Launched by SpaceX Failed to Reach Orbit

14:23  09 january  2018
14:23  09 january  2018 Source:   Time

SpaceX Has Launched the U.S. Government's Secretive 'Zuma' Spacecraft Into Orbit

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U . S . spy satellite that was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, aboard a SpaceX rocket on Sunday failed to reach orbit and is assumed to be a total loss, two U . S . officials briefed on the mission said on Monday.

A U . S . spy satellite that was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, aboard a SpaceX rocket on Sunday failed to reach orbit and is assumed to be a total loss, two U . S . officials briefed on the mission said on Monday.

In this handout provided by NASA, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches from Kennedy Space Center on June 3, 2017.© Bill Ingalls—NASA/Getty Images In this handout provided by NASA, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches from Kennedy Space Center on June 3, 2017. A U.S. spy satellite that was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, aboard a SpaceX rocket on Sunday failed to reach orbit and is assumed to be a total loss, two U.S. officials briefed on the mission said on Monday.

The classified intelligence satellite, built by Northrop Grumman, failed to separate from the second stage of the Falcon 9 rocket and is assumed to have broken up or plunged into the sea, said the two officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The satellite is assumed to be “a write-off,” one of the officials said.

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A U . S . spy satellite that was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, aboard a SpaceX rocket on Sunday failed to reach orbit and is assumed to be a total loss, two U . S . officials briefed on the mission said on Monday.

WASHINGTON — A U . S . spy satellite that was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, aboard a SpaceX rocket on Sunday failed to reach orbit and is assumed to be a total loss, two U . S . officials briefed on the mission said on Monday.

The presumed loss of the satellite was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

Northrop Grumman built the multibillion-dollar satellite, code-named Zuma, and was responsible for choosing the SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle, both officials said.

An investigation is under way, but there is no initial indication of sabotage or other interference, they said.

SpaceX spokesman James Gleeson said: “We do not comment on missions of this nature; but as of right now reviews of the data indicate Falcon 9 performed nominally.”

Space Exploration Technologies Corp, led by entrepreneur Elon Musk, launched its first satellite for the U.S. military with its Falcon 9 rocket in May of last year.

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Source: http://ca.pressfrom.com/news/technology/-59168-the-u-s-spy-satellite-launched-by-spacex-failed-to-reach-orbit/

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